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Web Writing: Create Writing Flow With Four Uncommon Connectors

Web Writing: Create Writing Flow With Four Uncommon Connectors

Connectors -- conjunctions, punctuation, and transitional
phrases -- allow readers to process information promptly by
creating balance and relationships between sentence parts.
The connectors are performing the same work as verbs,
objects, modifiers and multiple subjects.

Here are four uncommon connections that will create an
easier flow for your readers:

1. Parallel Constructions. This side-by-side structure
builds the bond between multiple joined parts. Example: In
the children's story, Peter Pan stresses the need "for Wendy
to sew" his shadow back on, "for her to return" to Never
Never Land with him to take care of the Lost Boys, and "for
them to leave" before her parents returned.

2. Beginning your sentence with a conjunction. One way to
divide a long sentence or several independent clauses is to
make each clause an independent sentence. And, but and or
are three common conjunctions used frequently. This
shortens the sentence, creates a conversational level, and
keeps the reader moving forward.

3. Creating A Series Without A Conjunction. Using
punctuation, usually commas but not limited to them, instead
of words to separate, opens the door of possibilities in the
reader's mind. It allows them to "feel" the "something
more" and mindfully fill in their own words. The series
allows readers to sense a separateness rather than a joined
relationship. Example: Tinker Bell got angry, didn't like
Wendy, flew frantically around the room. Many times editors
want to add a conjunction -- and, but or or -- to the last
series. When actually it is intentionally not added to
create the feeling of possibilities. Ask yourself, "Do I
want to create this feeling, or be more adamant with the
reader?"

4. Listing Your Series In Order of Length -- From Short to
Long. Arranging the words of your series from short to long
and from simple compound/ complex make the process easier to
understand. And if you can list them in alphabetical order
it expands flow. There has also been research done on how
people try to memorize and slow down when they read this
type of series.

In the first example, parallel construction, the listing was
an exception. The complex part was in the middle because of
the chronological series of events.

In the first paragraph, "verbs, objects, modifiers and
multiple subjects" is listed in the short to long and create
an easier reading flow. If you read the sentence this way:
"The connectors are performing the same work as modifiers,
multiple subjects, verbs, and objects" your mind stops and
goes. Many times this causes the reader to be confused or
even for them to exit.

Web writing differs from paper-printed writing because of
the way it is read. People scan what they read. This is
people don't blink and they approach the Net with a mind set
of information overload. Additionally, this is why there are
different structural rules. Using connectors is just one
such change you need to make in your writing for the World
Wide Web.

(c) Copyright 2004, Catherine Franz. All rights reserved.

Word count: 500

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About the Author

Catherine Franz, is a certified life and business coach
specializing in marketing and writing,Internet and
infoproduct development. For other articles, and ezines:
http://www.AbundanceCenter.com.


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