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Proper Technique for Quitting a Job

After months of looking you've finally found the job of your dreams. The new company loves you and wants you to start work as soon as possible. The only problem is how to quit the job you have? Though you may have fantasized about telling your present boss to take this job and, well, you know how the song goes, there is a right way and a wrong way to quit a job--and just up and quitting in a bout of anger is definitely the wrong way.

The right method of quitting a job means formally resigning from your position. And even when you're excited about leaving and perhaps even desperately want to leave, it can still be hard to actually resign. But it must be done--and the sooner the better. You should resign immediately when you've accepted a position with another company. This is particularly important if you're going to work for a competitor because some companies have policies where this could cause what they consider a conflict of interest and they will want you to leave immediately after you've given them your notice.

When resigning from a position, you will want to give your employer a written letter of resignation. This letter does not have to be long or detailed, but should include the following:

* Salutation to specific manager of the department you're leaving or Human Resources manager * Date of tendering your resignation * Date you'll be exiting your position * Brief explanation (i.e., I'm leaving to take a position that will offer more opportunity for advancement, to be a full-time mother, etc.)

Again, when writing your letter of resignation, there's no need for in-depth details or to give the name of the company you'll be going to work for. Also, don't give into the temptation to use your resignation letter to vent your anger and/or frustration. This could cause you career difficulties down the road. Make your resignation letter short and to the point, and keep it as positive as possible.

If you've had a good experience with your company and managers, don't be surprised if you receive a counter-offer. But you'd be wise not to take one. Staying with an employer that you've already made plans to leave rarely works out well. In fact, in most cases people end up leaving within a year after taking a counter-offer.

Emotions run high when you quit a job, even a job you dislike, and it's always easier to stay with the devil you know rather than take a risk on the one you don't know. Still, whatever reasons you had for seeking employment elsewhere will not go away if you decide to stay, so make your decision to leave and don't give into pressure to stay, well-intentioned as it may be. The last thing you want to do is to have to endure resigning all over again!
About the Author

William Nichols is the owner of La Job Hunter. Providing Los Angeles job search services, free resume posting, and original content to help you in your career advancement.


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