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8 Alluring Facts You Need to Know
About Andaman Islands

Andaman Islands

Andaman is appreciated for its gorgeous beaches, lush greenery, and underwater wonders since always. It is an Indian archipelago that comprises 572 beautiful islands out of which merely 36 are open for tourists. This attraction is a mingle of Southeast Asian and South Indian locals along with some Negrito ethnic masses on some selective islands.

Andaman tour packages offer to explore exotic places that reveal some alluring facts of the attraction. If you're the curious kind of a traveler then the following list of facts about Andaman is surely going to impress you. Let's have a look:-

  1. The origin of the names Andaman and Nicobar is from the Malay Language
    Andaman and Nicobar are well-known for their charm and beauty. It is one of the best attractions among tourists especially nature-lovers. The names of Andaman and Nicobar have been taken from the Malay language. It is said that the term Andaman is derived from the name Hanuman, which is also known as Handuman by Malays. The term Nicobar is often known to be the corruption of the term ‘Nakkavaram’ which is again a South Indian term.

  2. The 20 rupee note features an Andaman Island's scenic picture
    The 20 rupee note features a scenic picture of a beach and greenery. This same picture is that of the North Bay Island of Andaman. While heading to Andaman's Mount Harriet one can witness the same scene that the note depicts. Mount Harriet is Andaman's second-highest peak.

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  3. The most common language spoken on the land of Andaman by the locals is NOT Andamanese or Nicobarese
    Andaman and Nicobar have locals from various portions of the country. Surprisingly, the local language widely spoken here is not Andamanese or Nicobarese. The widely spoken language by the locals here is Bengali. Other languages spoken include Hindi, Telugu, Tamil, and Malayalam. For the trading purpose, the commonly used language in Andaman is Andaman Creole Hindi.
  4. The Alfred Caves of Andamans are home to unique Swiftlet Birds
    The ancient Alfred limestone Caves of Diglipur are one of the most popular attractions in Andaman. The limestone caves change their shape every year during the monsoons undergoing a chemical change. These narrow caves are home to the unique birds named Swiftlets. These birds craft edible nests. These are small brown-colored birds uses their own saliva to stick its home together as a small cup and keep it attached to the walls of the cave. These formations are known as stalactite formations that one can witness at Baratang's limestone caves.

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  5. Andaman is home to the world's largest sea turtle
    Andaman and Nicobar feature some of the best beaches and ample of underwater species like fishes and turtles. While speaking of turtles, Andaman houses unique species of sea turtles like Hawksbill turtle, the Leatherback turtles, and Green turtle. The Leatherback is the world's largest sea turtle.
  6. Commercial angling is not permitted in Andaman and Nicobar
    For over four decades commercial angling is banned around Andaman and Nicobar Islands. It is said that fishes in the waters in and around this place die due to old age and not by men. Marine life flourishes here with an ample population of dolphins, dugongs, sailfishes, whales, sea turtles, sea anemones, and others.
  7. North Sentinel Island is home to the paleolithic tribe, one of the world's most isolated tribes.
    The paleolithic tribe is one of the most isolated tribes of the world that is found in Andaman's North Sentinel Island. The tribe is estimated to be numbered around 300 and is known to point arrows to anyone else that comes even close to their range. It is said that they have lived up in the Andaman for up to 60,000 years.
  8. Andaman is home to the Barren Island - the only active volcano in South Asia
    Barren Island is South Asia's only active volcano that lies in Andaman. Nestled about 135 kilometers from Port Blair in the north-eastern direction. The island is 3 kilometers in width further featuring a crater of 1.6 kilometers width that is partly full of a cinder cone which has been the eruption source ever since. The first-ever eruption was recorded back in the year 1787.
Sunrise at the Havelock Islands

Sunrise at the Havelock Islands


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